Sister StyleSister StyleSister StyleHey, friends! Feels like summer is FINALLY in full swing here. We've had so much rain this season that it's felt like such a different summer than we're used to. Nice to have some bright and sunny days to get outside and enjoy. :)

Random fact: do you see my (Emma's) dress? I recently thrifted it for $3! It had long, poof-y sleeves that I altered myself since I've been getting more and more into sewing this year. I just loved the length and bottom hem of this dress, but the sleeves made it feel really costume-y. But, easy and quick fix. Elsie and I grew up thrifting together (A LOT!) so I love it when I can still find new-to-me items that I can add to my wardrobe. I'm also crazy for Elsie's flea market purse—love those stitched florals!

Sister Style   Emma's wearing: Dress/Thrifted, Belt/From a Modcloth dress, Sunnies c/o Lulu's, Shoes/ASOS, and Purse/Vintage. 

Sister Style    Sister Style     Elsie's wearing: Dress/Chicwish, Denim vest/ Target, Sunnies/Karen Walker, Purse/Flea market, Shoes/UO. 

Credits // Author: Emma Chapman, Photography: Jacki Moseley (And yes, we shot these photos by Jacki's family store! That's why her last name appears on the wall.) and Elsie Larson. Photos edited with A Beautiful Mess actions.

Great tips for shopping for your dream home! (click through for more)  It's always easier to go through stressful processes and seasons with friends by your side. While it's such an exciting time as well, finding and buying a new house definitely brings its own set of challenges and hangups to the table. So I've been glad that four different people in our office have been trying to find new houses all at the same time. There's emotional strength in numbers for sure, and it's been nice to share our similar successes and horror stories with each other. Since we are all buying houses for at least the second time, we've certainly learned a few things in the process that we thought we'd pass along to our other friends—you! Here are the top things to keep in mind if you are looking for a new place to call home:
 
Great tips for shopping for your dream home! (click through for more)
Make a list of priorities: Like the Rolling Stones say, "you can’t always get what you want," so you'll want to make sure that you have a solid list of priorities in order of what's most important to you and strive to get at least the top things on that list in one place. Unless you are just the luckiest duck on the planet or have an unlimited budget to build everything to your exact specifications, you'll eventually have to give up something on your list, but you'll want it to be a lower priority item. Are you most concerned about location? Square footage? A private backyard? You may have to forgo one thing to get another, but it's easier to be more focused when you know what's a nonnegotiable. Also, decide which things are preferences vs. needs on your list as well. For example, I loved the vaulted ceilings we had at our last house and really wanted to have them in our next space as well. I kept trying to hold out for tall ceilings, but the house that fit our top priorities was actually a Mid-century ranch. No vaulted ceilings anywhere. I had to realize that what was a "need" was actually more of a "want" and just switch my visual expectations a bit to get the things that really mattered most.
 
Think ahead: How long do you plan on staying in this house? If you are single or newly married, you may be fine with a smaller starter place that you plan on selling in a few years to get something bigger as life changes, but if you are planning on expanding your family or working from home soon, make sure you factor in the space you'll need so that you won't outgrow the space too quickly. In other words, don't buy for something that has features that you know will only work for a year if you plan on spending 10 years there. Of course, life is unpredictable and you can't plan for everything, but consider the things you know for sure or at least will most likely be the case in your near future.
 
Decide on your "most lived in" spaces: Where do you spend the most time in your current house? If you are an aspiring amateur chef, then you'll probably care about the kitchen set up a lot more than your friend who orders in most nights. So you should be more focused on loving that spot in a new house. I spend a lot of time in my living room watching movies with my kitties (especially when my husband is out of town on tour), so I would trade a kitchen or dining area that was just OK for a cozy den any day of the week. You probably won't be head over heels for every single room in a house, but if you get rooms you love where you spend the most time, then that tiny master bathroom won't seem quite so annoying.
 
Stick to your budget (and don’t torture yourself): Obviously the budget question is totally different for every person looking at a house, so there's really not a magic number for this category. A relatively standard goal is to try to keep your mortgage payment (with taxes and insurance included) at around 25% of your total household monthly income, but if you are living in a bigger city with high housing prices, you'll probably have to raise that number quite a bit. Just make sure that you've looked at your overall monthly budget to see what you really can afford (be honest!), and then only look at houses within your price range. Believe me, it's not a good idea to start looking at houses that are 1-2 price ranges above yours "just to see what's out there" because you will get house fever for something you can't buy and all of a sudden you think all the houses within your budget are totally lame. It's a lose-lose; don't do it. Depending on the market, however, it can be OK to look at houses a little over your budget in case there is a seller you can negotiate down to your range, but that's a lot more likely in a market that favors buyers instead of one where the sellers have control over pricing. 
 
Decide if you want a reno or a move-in ready house: Buying a house you plan on completely redoing is pretty different from getting something you can simply move right into, and most people know which category they lean towards (although you may be somewhere in the middle). If you know which path you want to take right off the bat, it helps narrow down your search and you can focus on viewing each house from that point of view. This decision also plays into pricing because if you decide on doing a renovation, then you don't want to look at houses that are already at the top of your budget—you'll have no money to renovate with! It's also good to keep in mind that you can't automatically get a renovation loan for the difference in your house price and your pre-approval amount (as in you can't necessarily get a 50k renovation loan just because you were pre-approved for 200k and only spent 150k on the house). They are separate loans, and sometimes the renovation loan is a lot harder to get. Your loan officer will help walk you through what's possible for your financial situation, but you'll want to be extra sure you can afford the renovations you want before you commit. 
 
Great tips for shopping for your dream home! (click through for more)Use X-ray vision to see through the "ugly": I know this is easier for some people than others, but it's really important for finding a diamond in the rough instead of passing on a house for cosmetic reasons. Just think about the bones of the house as you walk through it. Pay attention to the layout. Do you like the flow of the room spacing or is it awkward? Asking questions about the actual set up of the house rather than focusing on paint colors or flooring choices you don't care for will help you decide if you like what really matters about the space. Paint colors can be changed and flooring can be refinished, but it's a much bigger deal to move the kitchen to the opposite end of the house. It felt like the owner of our last house had chosen all the paint and tile colors to purposely torture my personal inner color palette (there's no such thing as "bad" colors, they just weren't "my" colors), but I liked the layout and location of the house. So I knew I would love it once it was done my way. If your biggest complaint in a space is the easily-changed orange accent wall, then it may actually be a great space for you!
 
Consider moving a little further out from town if on a budget: This one also can vary from place to place (you may not really live near a "town" to move further from), but those that are closer to a big city know that, generally, the further out you go from town, the more your money will buy for you. In some places, just going another 10 minutes out or moving to a "less trendy" spot can get you the same house for hundreds of thousands less. It's crazy!
 
Don’t give up! Especially if it takes a while, there will be a lot of days where you are so over this whole thing. You think you can't afford anything good, you'll never find the right location, you may as well just quit. Don't! We experienced this feeling a lot this year since we were obsessively looking every day for three months until we found something. Even if it takes months, it's worth it when you finally get something you love. And, the added benefit of a search that takes a while means that you've gotten a really good feel for that price range and location, so you know what's good, bad, overpriced, and underpriced, which will make you more confident about your choice once you make one. And if you don't get a house that you make an offer on? It's OK, that just means it's not the house for you and yours is still out there somewhere. We put in five offers (with bidding wars in every situation) before we got the house we did, and while we were disappointed every time we lost a house, we really feel that the one we ended up with is the best one for us all around.
 
Great tips for shopping for your dream home! (click through for more)    I'll add one more mini tip at the end, and that's to celebrate when you finally get the house. Elsie's Nashville house buying process was a lot shorter than mine was, but she kept a bottle of champagne for us in their fridge for months until we finally snagged a house and could celebrate together. So once you get that offer accepted, make sure to do something special to mark the occasion—you deserve it!
 
Wow, so much to deal with, right? Overall, buying a new place is a big (and sometimes stressful) decision, but we hope that our experiences will help make your move a little bit easier. Just picture yourself in your new space with all this hassle behind you...you can do it! Do you have other house hunting tips that you found helpful? xo. Laura
 
Credits // Author and Photography: Laura Gummerman. Photos edited with A Beautiful Mess actions.

Bedroom before and afterMint bedroomMint bedroom   Mint bedroom The house we purchased for our Habitat for Humanity project had two bedrooms, which we're excited to show you today!

One dilemma we faced was how to update the bedrooms without knowing who would be using them. It was a real head scratcher. We didn't know if the family who will eventually own this home would be a single mom with two young daughters, a single dad with a teenage son, a couple with a newborn, a couple with no children, or really anything in between. We just didn't have that information. For a while we thought we might just leave the rooms completely unfinished, but that just didn't feel right when you considered what we were doing throughout the rest of the house. 

Finally, we decided to keep the rooms as simple as possible but have adult-size beds in each. If the family doesn't end up needing one, they can always donate it or store it in the basement until they do. 

In the first bedroom (pictured above), we removed the old carpets and restored the wood floors. We repaired the walls and gave the room a fresh coat of paint. In each room we decided to paint one wall with an accent color to give the space a little personality. This room got mint (same as the door in the kitchen)! Our thought was that even if the family doesn't enjoy the color we chose, they will only need to paint over one wall (instead of all four), which is an easy and inexpensive update they can choose to make if they like. Won't hurt our feelings one bit. :)

Bedroom 2 before and afterCoral bedroom  Coral bedroom   Coral bedroom Coral bedroomThe second bedroom already had exposed wood floors, so we simply had to restore them, repair and paint the walls, and add a few fun touches like these DIY cement side tables. I love how cheery both bedrooms ended up feeling. We hope they make the family smile when they walk into their new home someday! xo. Emma, Elsie, and the ABM team.

PS - You can find the paint sources here. :)

Credits // Author: Emma Chapman, Photography: Janae Hardy and Sarah Rhodes. Photos edited with A Beautiful Mess actions. First bedroom: Lamps/Shades of Light, Night stand/Wayfair, Rug/Serena and Lily, Bed + linens/Pine Cone Hill and curtains/Target. Second bedroom: Acrylic shelf/West Elm, Rug/Lulu and Georgia, Pouf/Serena and Lily, Daybed + Floor lamp/IKEA, Throw pillows/Anek Designs, Clever Spaces, and River Oak Studio, and abstract artwork/Elizabeth Chapman.

Perfect for brunch! orange zest scones (click through for recipes       Although lately I've been much more of a coffee person than I've ever been before, I grew up being strictly a tea drinker. While I still love to dunk cookies into a warm drink, there aren't too many things than can beat a freshly made scone with your morning cup of tea (or coffee). My mom used to make these orange scones for us growing up and drizzle a sweet zesty icing on top. They are best just out the oven and perfect for a girls' brunch or special lazy Saturday breakfast.

Perfect for brunch! orange zest scones (click through for recipes)Orange Zest Scones, makes 8.

2 1/4 cups flour
5-6 tablespoons sugar
1 tablespoon baking powder
1/3 cup cold butter in pieces
1 tablespoon grated orange zest
1/2 cup fresh orange juice
1/4 cup milk
1 egg (slightly beaten)

For the icing:

2-3 tablespoons warm butter
3/4 cup powdered sugar
1 tablespoon grated orange zest
2 teaspoon orange juice
1-2 teaspoons milk

Perfect for brunch! orange zest scones (click through for recipes Mix together the flour, sugar and baking powder in a large bowl. Use a pastry blender to cut in the pieces of cold butter and orange zest until the mixture looks like course crumbles.

Perfect for brunch! orange zest scones (click through for recipes Add in the orange juice, milk and egg and mix until combined. Transfer the sticky dough to a floured surface and gently fold in flour until the dough is only slightly sticky. 

Perfect for brunch! orange zest scones (click through for recipes Roll out the dough to make a 10" circle and sprinkle 2 tablespoons of sugar on top of the dough. Use a pizza cutter to cut the circle into 8 sections (or 12 if you want smaller scones), and place the sections on a greased baking sheet or ungreased baking stone with a little room between the slices. 

Perfect for brunch! orange zest scones (click through for recipes Bake in a 400° oven for 15-17 minutes or until the edges start to brown.

For the icing, use a fork to mash together the warm butter and powdered sugar. Then add in the zest, juice and milk to form a runny buttercream type icing. If the icing is too thick, add more juice or milk, and if it's too runny, add more powdered sugar.

Drizzle the icing on the warm scones and serve immediately.

Perfect for brunch! orange zest scones (click through for recipes Perfect for brunch! orange zest scones (click through for recipes The scone itself is only lightly sweet, but it's balanced out by the light sugar coating and the sweet drizzled icing on top. If you aren't going to serve these right away, they will still be delicious, but I would wait to ice them until right before you serve your scones.

I have to say that I was having a bit of a rough week when I made these and the smell of the orange zest was so calming that baking these was kind of a stress relief from the rest of the day. I couldn't resist eating one right out of the oven, and it tasted so good and reminded me so much of home that I actually teared up a bit after my first bite. Whether you cry when you eat them or not, I hope making these becomes a happy memory for you too! xo. Laura

Credits/ Author and Photography: Laura Gummerman. Photos edited with A Beautiful Mess actions. 

GeometricPowerJewelryThis copper trend, huh! I just can't quit it! I use a lot of these copper pipes in my personal projects and was experimenting with smaller cuts when they sort of fell together in a triangle and I had a flash of inspiration. I have made a straw bunting before and arranged a himmeli from these same pipes. So the same principle of threading them together to form a shape easily married with the idea of making it into a wearable piece. It feels like a power necklace. I love it!

Copper Power Necklace
Supplies
Supplies:
-two 2' x 1/4" copper piping tubes
-6' of leather cord that will fit inside 1/4" tubes
-jump rings
-10mm rectangular end caps
-toggle clasp and ring
-pliers
-pipe cutter

Cut Your Copper DownCut your pipe down accordingly:
5 - 1" cuts
4 - 1.5" cuts
4 - 2" cuts 
2 - 2.5" cuts

StringOneShortAndTwoLongsYou'll create five triangles in a row going from smallest to largest and then back to smallest. Tie a loop knot at one end of your leather cord and then string one of your 1" cuts of pipe over your cord. Follow it up with two of the 1.5" cuts of pipe. Then loop the loose end of your cord back through the shortest piece of copper in the same direction you originally looped it through. Keep pulling your leather cord through all three pieces until you get them snugly into a triangle shape near the knotted end. 

Slide It Down and Add AnotherFor your second triangle, you'll repeat the process of adding one of the 1" pieces but then follow up with two of the 2" pieces of copper. Run that cord through the 1" piece for that triangle again and adjust things so that they're snugly nestled next to your first triangle. Repeat again with another 1" short piece and your two longest cuts of pipe for your center triangle. Continue in that fashion with your 2" cuts for your fourth triangle and your 1.5" cuts for your last triangle. 

Tie Off Other EndOnce you've adjusted them all so they are snugly touching top corners, tie another loop knot close to the corner. Trim it so that you have about 1/2" of a tail.

Tuck It InThen tuck that tail into the copper pipe so it won't be flapping around. This creates your bib piece. You'll use the rest of your leather cord for the straps in the next few steps.

Attach Your ClaspsUsing your pliers, connect your end caps to your toggle ring and clasp. 

IMG_7709For a necklace that rests on your chest, cut two lengths of leather that are 12" each. Loop one length through one of the loop knots on one side of the triangles. Bring the two loose ends together again and tie a knot as shown above. Repeat on the other side. 

Attach to Leather CordsTrim your loose ends so they're even and about 1/2" from your knot. Then clamp your end caps over the loose ends with your pliers. 

PipeNecklaceDIYYou now have a bold piece from the hardware section to liven up your favorite casual tee and boyfriend jeans. Simplify things a bit and do just one triangle on a longer leather cord for a completely different, yet equally fantastic necklace! -Rachel

Credits//Author and Photography: Rachel Denbow. Photos edited with A Beautiful Mess actions.

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